A walk from Somerby

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Somerby shop and main street

Somerby shop and main street

Back to my theme of linear walks. This one from Melton Mowbray via the bus service 113 taking me to Somerby where I pick up the Leicestershire Round. I can’t recall that I’ve walked this section in reverse. This offers totally different views and with the limited sun behind me picking out new features in the landscape I enjoyed the walk across to the Punch Bowl.

I was delighted to find that the path through oilseed had been mown, this suggested a recent job but better late than never. It was rather a thin crop and it was clear to see where walkers had trodden a narrow path before a real path had been made.

Footpath D69 on the Leicestershire Round looking north

Footpath D69 on the Leicestershire Round looking north

By the time I dropped down the steps into the Punchbowl it was time for lunch so I rested on Jim’s seat which still looks good after four years.

Jim's seat in May 2017 still looks good 4 years after installation.

Jim’s seat in May 2017 still looks good 4 years after installation.

I appear to have a reputation for reporting lots of path issues but all I found on this eight mile walk was one rotten waymark post resting against a tree on the Jubilee Way at the start of the Dalby Hills permissive path.

LFA has started a trend on the Ernest Cook Trust Estate. A new resting place has been supplied by Jack Atton and Terry Darby who, while working as woodmen for the Trust, planted the trees here between 1980 and 1996 .

Jack Atton and Terry Darby's seat with a fine view across to Little Dalby

Jack Atton and Terry Darby’s seat with a fine view across to Little Dalby

It can be very muddy along the permissive path but it was fairly dry on this visit with views north through the still leafless trees. Finding the Other Route with Public Access to head north from Burrough Hill was a challenge. I mistook a stile as the route also used by horses but it came to an abrupt halt by a fence and ditch. Try again………. not quite on track but I eventually met the road from where a hedged track is clear to see and use.

Burrough Hill flanked by gorse in flower - the smell was delightful.

Burrough Hill flanked by gorse in flower – the smell was delightful.

The ORPA heads north into Melton where it meets Sandy Lane. It’s part of the National Cycle Network and has been given a metalled surface. Cars are prevented by blocks of concrete firmly blocking some of the gates so it’s pedestrians only and easy walking. The view to the east is far ranging especially from Gartree Hill.

When the cycle track becomes a proper road I turn right along a bridleway, a little apprehensive with such a sea of yellow ahead will there be a path? Well there was and here it was vital. A vigorous crop as tall as me, again cut a bit late and when it starts to flop the path will disappear. I timed my walk spot on.

Looking south from the junction of paths D98A and D99 near Burton Lazars.

Looking south from the junction of paths D98A and D99 near Burton Lazars.

I cross the busy A606 and take a combination of well walked paths and tracks into Melton. The final mile is alongside the River Eye then between the buildings of what was pedigree Petfoods but now just says Mars. I did make a short detour under the railway on what Network Rail call the towpath while making plain this is not a public right of way. It does offer a handy short cut from the housing estate into the top end of town.

 

 

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