Spring 2011 – Newsletter

by

Walking Week June 4th to 12th 2011 – but read on, there’s more

We were very pleased to be involved in LCC’s walking Week in 2010 and impressed by the varied programme and the huge numbers of people who were encouraged to walk. There are plans to change the system this year, in the hope of getting even more participation in regular walking groups rather than simply coming out during the one week of the festival.

There will be only 10 flagship walks during the week from June 4th to 12th 2011 but there will be a printed directory of public walks run by groups like ours who welcome newcomers.

It is hoped that groups will run special events or/and put on specially attractive walks during the festival week. These can be publicised in the festival week programme.

Look out in the Events Guide (where our book will be advertised) and in the leaflets which should be in libraries and other usual places which advertise event.

Also The National Forest walking Festival will be held in May. Our Association are leading walks on Thursday, 26th and Saturday, 28th May. To request copies of the programme by e-mail visit their website at:-www.thenationalforestwalkingfestival.org.uk

AGM Report

Our speaker this year was John Stanley who with his wife Pat breeds bulls so he knows a thing or two about them. He gave a short informative and entertaining presentation. They keep the Blackbrook Longhorns (see their website) and have taken many prizes since 1989. It was, however, their temperament which most interested our audience and John gave some assurance that these are a beef bulls and are very docile, unlike dairy bulls of which farmers are very wary. John’s advice was give a wide berth to cows with calves, don’t startle them, approach them from behind and they like a tail rub not a pat on the head. Cattle can be frisky especially when first let out but a gentle wave or tap on the rump should get them away from obstructing a stile or gate. Members asked a number of questions, some approaching the facts of farm life. Apparently semen can now be sexed reducing the number of unwanted dairy bulls.
The formal meeting went well with any other business being dispersed throughout the meeting. Peter Butt has stepped down after his three years leaving us an improved Chairman’s Cup and gavel. Chris M was elected unopposed as our new Chairman. The food looked fantastic and I hadn’t booked lunch, I’ll know better next year which will again be at Woodhouse Eaves, the meeting voted for no change of venue.

Doggerel Walking   submitted by Neil B
(to be read with a touch of Pam Ayres)

`I GO OUT WITH A WALKING GROUP
IT’S CALLED THE EL EF AY
I DON’T KNOW WHAT IT STANDS FOR
BUT I JOINED THEM ANYWAY

IT DOESN’T MATTER WHAT YOU WERE
OR WHAT YOU USED TO EARN
JUST GIVE A LITTLE FRIENDSHIP
YOU’LL FIND IT IN RETURN

IT’S SOMETIME SINCE  I JOINED THEM
I KNOW THEIR FUNNY WAYS
I KNOW WHAT’S  TROUBLING WHO
AND WHAT THEIR DOCTOR SAYS

THERE’S EVERY COMPLEX AILMENT
AND SOME HAVE MORE THAN ONE
IF YOU HAVEN’T YET A PROBLEM
IT’S SURE TO COME ALONG

WE ASSEMBLE IN THE MORNING
AT A WALKER  FRIENDLY  PUB
WE THEN PUT ON OUR HIKING GEAR
AND CHOOSE OUR LUNCHTIME GRUB

OH HELL I HAVEN’T GOT MY BOOTS
I CAN’T THINK WHAT TO DO
R HAS COME WITH TWO LEFT FEET
AND ONE OF THEM’S A SHOE

WE ENJOY OUR SIX MILE RAMBLE
WE CHAT AND PUFF ALONG
SOME STAY QUIET AND LISTEN
AND SOME JUST RAMBLE ON

I SAY WHO’S BRINGING UP THE REAR
HE’S GONE BEHIND A TREE
HEY UP IT’S OLD WHAT’S HIS NAME
WHO LIKES HIS CUP OF TEA

THE PUB IS NEAR, THE PACE PICKS UP
THE FIRST IS AT THE BAR
THOSE NURSING ACHES AND PAINS
STILL WILTING BY THEIR CAR

WE SIT AND WAIT FOR FOOD TO COME
THE CHATTER’S VOLUME TEN
BUT SLOWLY AS THE MEALS ARRIVE
THERE’S SILENCE ONCE AGAIN

ANOTHER DAY, ANOTHER WALK
ANOTHER MEAL AND BOOZE
ANOTHER HAPPY WANDER HOME
A CUP OF TEA AND SNOOZE

I GO OUT WITH A WALKING GROUP
IT’S CALLED THE EL EF AY
I DON’T CARE WHAT THEY CALL IT
‘COS I LIKE THEM ANYWAY

Footpath claim Oadby  – Knighton – report Brian.

In January a public inquiry was held into a claim for a footpath from the eastern end of Wimborne Road via the Northern side of the Golf course club house and then continuing to join footpath Z6 from Oadby to Knighton. Local residents gave evidence in support of the footpath but the Racecourse and Golf course owners disputed any right of way across their property.

The Inspector found there was insufficient evidence to confirm the order. Obstructing the gap alongside the Wimborne Road gate, locking the gates to the golf course car park on several days each year and challenging some path users, was sufficient indication given of the landowners lack of intention to dedicate the route as a right of way.

The LFA were only acting as a watching brief and did give evidence in this case.

A HORSE, A HORSE, MY KINGDOM FOR A HORSE

We recently did a walk with Martin W to look at what is now accepted as being the true site of the battle of Bosworth field about two miles south of the present heritage centre at Ambion Hill.

Richard III’s encampment was on Ambion HiIl  when he charged down to combat Henry Richmond the claimant to the throne who was approaching Fen Lane, less than a mile away Richard, fully armed and wearing his crown,  was accompanied by a few of his knights, ahead of his main body of troops,. 

It was here in the marshy plain of Redmoor near Fenn Farm, that Richard’s horse stumbled and he fell, calling for another horse, according to Shakespeare, so that he could fight on.  He was killed as he approached Dadlington.

Henry, as victor of the battle went to nearby Stoke Golding. To the hill called Crown Hill (or Crown Field) which has been traditionally known as the place where the new king received the royal crown ‘found among the spoils of the field’. Dadlington has documents relating to a Royal licence for its church to collect alms and to build and maintain a chantry for prayers for the souls of those slain in battle ‘standing upon a parcel of ground where Bosworth field otherwise called Dadlyngton field’.

It would be good to have a circular walk going through all these places: the present heritage centre on Ambion Hill, Dadlington and Stoke Golding and a linking of existing paths would make this easily done. We have looked at the route to make a circular walk of about 8 miles. There is only one missing link, between Dadlington and Stoke Golding, along the parish boundary of Stoke Golding. Parish boundaries were traditionally walked by villagers on Rogation days,  and I wonder if Stoke Golding parish might be interested in the idea of allowing their boundary to be walked at this point, not just on Rogation day, but in the interests of  making this circular walk around the landmark sites of the battlefield.                               

Heather

Bosworth Battlefield - new site

From LCC Website: The relocated battlefield is entirely on farm land owned by several private individuals and general access to the land is understandably very limited. Negotiations are underway with the key landowners but LCC has decided to focus external interpretation of the battlefield on Ambion Hill.

Do they need an extra push to fulfil Heather’s dream?

Leicestershire Round at Ratcliffe College

Highway rights were going to be extinguished along the lane to the rear of Ratcliffe College leaving just footpath rights. The farmer had negotiated with the College to give them an alternative exit – a bit further east in return for removing their traffic from the existing lane. Vicky A was out riding one day and read a notice that said this would be done in Loughborough Magistrates Court on 30 Nov. 2010.

Vicky says she considered this a road through to the Seagrave-Thrussington road and was appalled that this would be lost, so immediately set about finding the evidence for a DMMO application which was submitted in Nov. Apparently there had been a diversion in the Magistrates Court in 1937 to allow Capt Everard (of Ratcliffe Hall) to build an aerodrome. The route had been diverted as a bridleway (which agrees with the 1873 map in the Records Office). As the 1937 decision in the Magistrates Court was a “legal event” it can be used to change the Definitive Map from footpath to bridleway.

As all this is in Cossington Parish, but some way away from the village, and the 1937 diversion was quickly followed by the war, it’s perhaps not surprising that the Parish Return c.1950 was not accurate. They considered College Lane to be a road and didn’t include it in their return. It has acquired full highway rights because the council has repaired it as such, and it is these that have been extinguished, so we are back at the 1873/1937 status.

Vicky A (Leicestershire & Rutland Bridleways Association)

A tale warning us to read those notices while we are out walking.  (Ed.)

_________________________________________________

Thank you – The family of the much missed Ken Wadd thank deeply members and past members of the LFA for the messages, gifts and cards and have been immensely lifted by your support. Kathleen, Martin and Madeline.

__________________________________________________

Barn Dance in the Treasurer’s Barn on Saturday 4th June details and price to be confirmed – should be on a slip with this posting. Contact Jane Dewes for details

_____________________________________________

Tuesday Walk Start Point Now on the website so if you haven’t been out for a few weeks take a look at the website.

New pages on the web site – Our Favourite Walks & Stiles or Gates?

https://leicestershirefootpaths.wordpress.com/          or search.

Advertisements